Shoulder1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Shoulder News
Feature Story
Shoulder Technology
Real Life Recoveries
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
 Shoulder  Hero™
Dr. Evan Flatow:
Innovating Shoulder Surgery
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion in  Our Forums
 Community
Shoulder1 Forums
Patient Stories
Shoulder Journals
 Reference
Ask an Expert
FAQ's
Locate a Doctor
Reference Library
Anatomy
Video Library
 Bookmark Us
 
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
November 24, 2017  
SHOULDER NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Links/Reprints
  • shoulder

    Orthopedic outcomes affected by activity level


    July 10, 2014

    Source: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    According to a literature review in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), patients' activity level is a strong predictor for how well they will do with certain treatments and how well they recover from injuries after treatment. Patients are encouraged to ask their orthopaedic surgeon if activity level is an important factor in their treatment decision. For example, more active patients are at a higher risk of re-injury after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and activity level should be considered when deciding which graft to use in the ACL repair.

    Easily administered, standardized scales for the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle are commonly used in orthopaedics to quantify a patient's activity level. But, the measures of how often, rather than how well, a task is performed do not account for symptoms, functional disabilities, age, weight, overall health and other factors which also may impact prognostic and outcome variables.

    "In orthopaedics, we want to restore function to take away pain and to help patients return to activity," said orthopaedic surgeon and lead study author Robert H. Brophy, MD. "We're still learning about how to best use, quantify and measure activity levels to optimize prognostics and outcomes."

    Other literature review highlights:

    Shoulder

    • The strongest predictors for failure in rotator cuff tears were patient expectations on the efficacy of physical therapy and baseline activity level.
    • After a rotator cuff tear, patients who were active were less likely to respond to nonsurgical treatment.

    Hip

    • Preoperative activity levels, age, male gender and lower body mass index (BMI) were predictors of higher activity level at one and five years following total hip replacement surgery.
    • Physical activity - including occupational lifting and standing - may accelerate the development and increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA).

    Knee

    • Higher baseline activity, lower baseline BMI and higher level of athletic competition were associated with higher activity levels two years after ACL reconstruction.
    • Female gender, smoking in the 6-month period before surgery, and revision ACL reconstruction were associated with lower activity level.
    • Following ACL reconstruction, patients were significantly less satisfied if they had a lower post-surgical activity level.
    • Increased incidences of knee injury and trauma in the athletic population, rather than participation in physical activity, may cause an increased risk of knee OA.

    "There's not just one activity level variable" in these measurements, said Dr. Brophy. "It depends on the population, the injury you're studying, etc. We're making progress, and the progress varies depending on what you're looking at."

    Discuss in the Shoulder1 forums

    Photo: Jösé

    Last updated: 10-Jul-14

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Shoulder1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Surgery A Treatment Option For Young Patients With Shoulder Injuries

    Recommendations For Tablet Computer Use To Avoid Shoulder Pain

    3-D Motion Detection System Could Prevent Shoulder Injuries In Baseball Pitchers

    New IDSA Guidelines Aim To Reduce Death, Disability And Cost Of Prosthetic Joint Infections

    Biceps Tenodesis Hastens Recovery From Shoulder Injuries

    Previous 5 Features ...

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    Interview with Dr. Andrews

    The Advent of the Arthroscope 1 - Interview with Dr. Andrews

    More Features ...
     
    Related Content
    Identifying Patients Who Can Skip ACL Reconstruction

    In It for the Long Haul – Part Two

    John Kerry Undergoes Shoulder Surgery

    Olympic Swimmer Thomas Overcomes Shoulder Injuries

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.