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May 26, 2020  
FORUMS: Read-Only

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Topic Title: Ream and Run Recovery
Created On: 01/03/2012 08:48 AM
 
 01/02/2017 11:26 AM

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yar250f

<p>&#160;have you any new info as to success rate of prolotherapy- age 61 osteoarthritis , rotator cuff tears, seperation between humerus and socket non- existent</p>
 11/17/2012 10:40 AM

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FullROM50

[br]Good point. It pretty much depends on how far the condition has progresses. In my case, both the ball and the socket had disintegrated. There wasn't just cartilage loss. The joint was in pieces. There was no saving anything. I agree that the risk of joint replacement surgery may be greater than prolotherapy. So, perhaps this treatment option is suited for some. At any rate, thanks for your update and good luck. [br]
 11/17/2012 12:45 AM

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NickCat11

HGH is FDA approved. As long as it's not abused, it's considered safe. It's been used in prolotherapy for many many years. Here's one of many articles on it [url=http://prolotherapysc.com/pdf/Dr_Ravin_HGH.pdf]http://prolotherapysc.com/pdf/Dr_Ravin_HGH.pdf[/url]. Again, my main point here is to show people non-invasive ways to heal orthopedic issues. I think we can both agree that you can't undue a very invasive surgery and the detrimental effects it can have on you if there are complications. As an example, in 2008 there were 4964 documented deaths due to knee replacement complications and that's just through Medicare (Yikes!). Prolotherapy has been proven to be extremely safe in all its various forms with almost a 0% complication rate. To me it's a no brainer to try prolotherapy first. Really all you have to lose is that it doesn't work. [br]
 11/15/2012 07:03 PM

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FullROM50

I read your story on kneeguru, and I'm really glad it helped you. But the fact that HGH was involved would already turn me off. The side effects are severe and are not fully understood. Additionally, we have to be sure the improvement has a lasting effect.
 11/12/2012 06:46 AM

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NickCat11

FullROM50,[br][br]The MRI report clearly states that 50% of the cartilage regenerated in the defect on my humerus (right where they put the stem cells). Tonight when I have time I'll upload the whole report since I guess you still find it hard to believe. If I can figure out how to do the pics too I will do that. Obviously I don't take any pain meds, never have. If you knew anything about prolotherapy or stem cell therapy you would know that meds would defeat the whole process behind that approach. I plan on getting another injection in 6 months. If you'd like you can read my full journey so far here at kneeguru...[url=http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61013.0]http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61013.0.[/url] [br][br][url=http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61013.0][/url]
 11/11/2012 10:44 PM

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FullROM50

I'm very glad to hear your stem cell treatment was successful. And yes, I'm a critic and still sceptical. Can you provide before and after radiographs, so we can see where the 50% regrowth of cartilage took place? It's nice to know your shoulder feels better and that's ultimately what's important. Are you taking any meds that might cause your shoulder to feel better? Also are you going to need more injections to achieve 100% regeneration? I wish you good luck and a full recovery. FullROM50
 11/09/2012 04:21 PM

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NickCat11

I'd like to give an update on my condition. I've received 3 stem cell injections throughout one years time for my 1.5 x 2cm full thickness defect on my humerus. The recent MRI states 50% regeneration of new cartilage within the defect. My pain is way down and range of motion is great. They just featured my case in a blog post, the link is below. Hopefully this sheds some light on the critics out there...[br][br][url=http://www.regenexx.com/2012/11/stem-cell-based-shoulder-cartilage-regeneration-in-philly/]http://www.regenexx.com/2012/11/stem-cell-based-shoulder-cartilage-regeneration-in-philly/[/url][br]
 07/28/2012 11:26 PM

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FullROM50

It can work for women. I've talked to one who was progressing very well in rehab at the time I had my surgery. She was an aerobics instructor and very motivated. Not trying to contradict the study, but I wouldn't place too much stake on that. I do know that people who have had too many surgeries on the shoulder will have difficulty achieving perfect ROM due to scar tissue. I'm sure my surgeon, Dr. Moskal could correct your problem, if your rotator cuff is in good shape, and your overall health is good enough to make it through 12 weeks of intense rehab.[br]
 07/24/2012 06:18 PM

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misty3

<div class="cit">Interesting articles by Dr. Matsen - the first was just published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, July 18, 2012. The most important thing is having a good result, but this doesn't appear to work for women.[br][br]The Prognosis for Improvement in Comfort and Function After the Ream-and-Run Arthroplasty for Glenohumeral Arthritis: An Analysis of 176 Consecutive Cases[br][br]Knowledge of the factors affecting the prognosis for improvement in function and comfort with time after <span class="highlight">shoulder</span> arthroplasty is important to clinical decision-making. This study sought to identify some of these factors in 176 consecutive patients undergoing the ream-and-run procedure.[br][br]This study is unique in that it characterizes the factors affecting the time course for improvement in <span class="highlight">shoulder</span> comfort and function after a ream-and-run procedure. Improvement occurs after this procedure for at least 1.5 years. This procedure appears to be best suited for an older male patient with reasonable preoperative <span class="highlight">shoulder</span> function without prior <span class="highlight">shoulder</span> surgery.[br][br][url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17448695]J[/url]ournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 2007</div>
Shoulder arthroplasty: the socket perspective.[br]Matsen, Bicknell, Lippitt[br]
<div class="abstr">[br]Although much attention has been directed to the development of the humeral components used in shoulder arthroplasty, the major unsolved challenge lies on the glenoid side of the articulation. This challenge arises from difficulties resisting eccentric loading and providing adequate implant-bone fixation. Current glenoid component designs use polyethylene and polymethyl methacrylate and are prone to loosening, plastic deformation, particulate debris, and third-body wear. Metal-backed components present further challenges, and results have generally been disappointing. There is interest in biologic resurfacing procedures, including the interposition of fascia, capsule, or meniscal allograft and nonprosthetic glenoid arthroplasty, or what has become known as the "<span class="highlight">ream</span>-and-<span class="highlight">run</span>" procedure. Despite encouraging results, important questions remain unanswered about these procedures. However, each may warrant further exploration with a goal of providing an effective and durable approach to glenoid arthritis that avoids the risks associated with polymethyl methacrylate and polyethylene.</div>
 07/24/2012 04:57 PM

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FullROM50

As I stated earlier, great potential, but not ready for prime time...Meanwhile, even after 2.5 years past ream and run surgery my shoulder is still improving in strength. I'm over the moon pleased with the outcome. FullROM50
     
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