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May 25, 2020  
FORUMS: Read-Only

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Topic Title: Growth Hormone
Created On: 05/21/2005 09:53 AM
 
 04/30/2013 03:09 AM

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manuel4md

how about stem cell treatment for regeneration?

check this out [url=http://www.stemcellorthopedic.com/]http://www.stemcellorthopedic.com[/url] and tell me guys what you think.
 06/09/2012 12:33 AM

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NCTriathlon1

[font size="2"][br]Well..., it's hard to believe it has been 8 years since my shoulder surgery. I'm happy to report all is well :-)[br][br]So far there have been no ill effects from utilizing rHgh or Anabolics to facilitate my recovery post-surgery.[br][br]Full ROM is still in effect and I can happily say that I have resumed Rock Climbing as well as swimming - with no problems whatsoever.[br][br]I stumbled back across this site due to a friend who is having a tough time following his shoulder surgeries.[br][br]Good luck to all the peeps facing surgery....[br][br][url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbmr.5650111217/abstract]http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbmr.5650111217/abstract[/url][br][br][url=http://www.flexcellint.com/PDF/AJSM2004.pdf]http://www.flexcellint.com/PDF/AJSM2004.pdf[/url][br][/font]
 10/25/2005 11:45 PM

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iyamsteve

mm-in your previous post you stated that I had used hgh for 2 years with little results. You need to re-read my post. I said that for the first year and a half I did nothing but exercise, stretch and take pain meds, no hgh. I started hgh a year and a half after surgery and in the first month I went from a range of motion of 70% to at least 85%. I am happy to report now that I have even more range of motion. I feel if I had started hgh right after surgery I would be in better shape now.
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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flyingfishmaster

I would like to support what you say. Mainly from just reading about hgh on this board I asked my surgeon aboutit and I faxed him 2 articles. He didn't answer but I found myself a longevity dr. who suggested I start taking hgh BEFORE surgery. I had a blood profile done, hgh was non-existent, out of range, (I am 60, female)and I began injecting it 3 weeks before my surgery for a complete rotator cuff tear and biceps tendenosis. I would never have thought of this but I also have polymyalgia rheumatica and am on nsaids and prednisone (although I was able to be off the prednisone for 3 weeks prior to surgery and 4 weeks after) so I felt I needed every possible additional help I could get. I had surgery on April 1 and I must say it was the easiest surgery I've every had (including an acromion shave on the other shoulder), I am sleeping well with virtually no pain and in the last few days I am even able to sleep on the operated shoulder. You may say oh, the prednisone and nsaids, but I tore my rc in aug 2004 and have been in a lot of pain since then no matter what the doses of prednisone and nsaids. So thanks to all you who made me aware of hgh and its benefits for rc repair! I am not yet out of the sling, but my ROM seems very good already (I do passive exercises like pulling the operated arm over my head while lying down). I am Amazed!
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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ccooper

The previous poster has a few misconceptions that I would like to clear up. 1) I never claimed that you "need" rHGH, but I do claim that it helps you heal faster and better than you otherwise would. This is an important point -- you can do without it, but if you can afford it, I think it adds incremental benefit. 2) One anecdote is not "proof" about either the benefits or the limits of rHGH. Anecdotes are helpful, but you also need to review the controlled scientific papers and try to extrapolate to your particular situation. 3) I, too, spend a lot of time in the gym, and I will be the first to say that that is much more important than any drugs you take. 4) I am 53. In my opinion, taking is rHGH is not very useful for anybody under 40, and becomes more useful the older you are. This is because your endogenous levels of growth hormone decline with age. 5) It was not entirely accurate to say that I am at 95% (or 70%) of "normal". It is more accurate to say that my right shoulder is 95% as strong as my left. Because I have been spending time in the gym, both shoulders are actually stronger than they were 5 years ago, or even 30 years ago.
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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mm

I had major shoulder surgery, just 11 months ago and have FULLY RECOVERED with BETTER strength levels than I had before the injury that led to my surgery in the first place!! YEAH! I am an avid bodybuilder, 44 YO, and my recovery did not involve using any growth hormone, or steroids at all. Just a great surgeon, a great PT team and lots of stretching and common sense. I did not need the steriod, RGH "treatment". For me the real deal worked better than using steriods and I also eliminated the risk of developing permanent future problems as a result of steroid usage. The poster before me mentioned that they have been using rgh for 2 years and the shoulder is just 70 percent. Seems like the steriods didnt heal him so quickly. I am proof that the stuff isnt necessary. good luck
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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ccooper

My first visit to this forum, and I saw this thread and had to reply. I have had two shoulder surgeries, both due to massive rotator cuff repair and various other things. First one was 5 years ago, re-injury was 2 years later. It is now 3 years since the most recent surgery, and I would say that my shoulder is at 95% of normal. I began my hGH program immediately after the first injury. Surgery was a couple of months after the injury. After 2 years of weights and other physical activities, I felt that the shoulder was at only about 70% of normal. Perhaps this was due to the substantial axillary nerve damage which appears to take a long time to recover from. I reinjured the shoulder in another skiing accident that seemed very minor at the time. Perhaps the repair was not very complete. But by this time I had been on hGH continually, and also take other hormones such as testosterone. Recovery from this surgery seemed to take about as long as the first. I have kept up with weight lifting, and also the hGH and testosterone, and my shoulder feels very strong and has great range of motion. This progress has been slow but steady over the last 3 years. In my opinion it takes years of work to get the joint back to anything close to normal. That includes exercise plus hormones and supplements. A couple of years ago I didn't think it was possible to reach this level...and perhaps I am fooling myself, and the joint is weaker than it feels...but it feels pretty good. If you can afford it, I highly recommend hGH for injury repair and for overall health. Its effects are fairly subtle, but add up over the long term.
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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iyamsteve

Hoo Yah!! Just finished my first month on HGH and feel 100% better. Had RC surgery with two anchors Sept 2003 and it was downhill from there. Almost gave up hope of ever being "normal" again until now. My shoulder locked up tighter than a drum after surgery. Although I feel 100% better I am still not 100% in range of motion. I feel like I have come from about 70% to 85% since starting HGH a month ago. For the first time since surgery a year and a half ago I feel like I will get close to 100% in the future. Trock - Thanks for the guidance and many links you have posted here. It has been instrumental in my recovery.
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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NCTriathlon

Contrary to what some people think, not all shoulder surgeries go well even if performed by the most skilled of surgeons and even if the patient does everything right. A leading researcher from NEW YORK states: "Our failure rates are quite high, up to 50%.." (Dr. Scott Rodeo. Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. June 25th, 2004. Annual Meeting, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Quebec City, Canada)(link: http://wwww.hss.edu/Physicians/Profiles/Rodeo-Scott Link: http://www.arthritisissues.com/ms/news/519754/main.html Is a failure rate up to 50% acceptable to those of us who have suffered massive tears? I don't think so!! Generally, statistical analysis is fairly accurate. Sure, you will get varied numbers dependent upon what procedures were performed. Nevertheless, one number is guaranteed even with the most conservative of studies; 10% will fail or will have major complications. Are these the odds you're willing to risk in which you'll have to confront for the rest of your life if you happen to fall into the 10-50% group?? NOT ME!!!! Typically, small tears involving 1 tendon up to moderate size generally do well. However, larger tears are a whole different story. clicky: http://www.readingshoulderunit...OTATOR_CUFF_REPAIR.htm clicky: http://www.wheelessonline.com/...nt_of_massive_rtc_tear Rotator cuff tears are classified as partial thickness/incomplete tears and FULL Thickness tears. Full thickness tears occur when portions of the rotator cuff tendon pull completely away from the bony insertion site (AKA avulsion). Full thickness tears are also broken down further by shape and size (I'll not go into shape). And you know what? If your repair fails, the surgeon cannot be held responsible for the failure in most cases! You know why? The responsibility lies in our bodies ability to produce the neccessary components required to achieve a good result following a good repair! Full thickness tears are classified by surgeons as small/minor 5cm involving 2 or more tendons that require extensive debridement, mobilization and reconstruction. It is generally accepted that those with massive tears MAY usually be irreparable especially if atrophy has taken place. For a minor tear, success rates are in the vicinity of 90%. Nevertheless, the success rate and return to function is VERY dependent on the SIZE of the tear, the bigger the tear the worse the result. Even with successful surgery you will never have a normal shoulder, but you should achieve good function and excellent pain relief provided you don't have a MASSIVE tear. clicky: http://www.orthosports.com.au/shoulder_arcr.html Lets face it, Tendons/muscles just don't heal well when sewn back to bones. The actual healing process can take up to two years. clicky: http://www.orthop.washington.e...bID__3367/default.aspx Heaven forbid the patient be Osteoporotic, have a low bone turnover rate or have poor collagen synthesis. The above adds up to poor Bone Morphogenic Production which is detrimental to the success of rotator cuff surgery. clicky: http://www.aaos.org/wordhtml/r..._Future_Directions.pdf clicky: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/huma...PB%20MANUAL%202004.pdf Having said all the above, rhGH and Anabolic steroids utilized within legitament medical studies show overwhelmingly that it increases "Bone Morphogenic Production" clicky: http://endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/139/9/3855 rhGH& anabolics "increases collagen production ten-fold" clicky: http://www.meds.com/conrad/acs/burns.html It also "enhances bone turnover rate" clicky: http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/86/3/957 And anabolics also cause the tissue to have a more organized cytoskeleton which is neccessary for the structure of the tendon. clicky: http://www.shoulder1.com/news/mainstory.cfm/68/6 The proof is in the pudding! MTM & I have been extremely fortunate to have had total success following our surgeries. Nevertheless, some surfing these boards may not have had the luxury of experiencing near 100% success. That is primarily why I have kept this thread alive and have posted so much on this topic and will continue to do so(Hey, I'm a health care worker! Looking out for patients is in my interest). I AM a walking testament to a good surgeon (Dr. Robert Liljeberg: http://www.carolinaortho.com/Pages/Lilje.html )a good PT program (@Carolina Orthopaedics), and solid advice regarding the medically supervised and prescribed administration of hormones ( http://www.caldwellmemorial.org/employee.php?eid=38 ) My injuries consisted of a total avulsion of the Subscapularis, Infraspinatus, and Supraspinatus tendons (complete 3 tendon avulsion/MASSIVE tear.5cm). My labral injury consisted of a SLAP IV lesion in which the Labrum was completely detached and torn on itself. I am now 100% recovered and enjoy Rock Climbing with my children! Deep within, I know HORMONES played a key role in my success!! -MARK-
 05/21/2005 09:54 AM

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mm

I am a 43 yo bodybuilder,and fitness trainer. I sustained a fall in Feb 04,resulting in a sever shoulder injury. IT was a devastating injury to asy the least for me. I Had arthroscopic surgery in Jun 04. Procedure's done were a SLAP II repair, suspraspinatus tendon avulsion repair back to the humerous and the removal of 2 bone spurs. I just passed the 10 month point since my surgery. I am back to bodybuilding as well as everything I could not do after my injury. My surgery was a total success. The key to my difficult recovery was a great surgeonm aggressive PT, LOts of stretching which is till ongoing today, massage, whirlpool at the gym and common sense. I did not need STEROIDS or growth hormone to quicken my recovery. YOU do not need them. My surgeon is one of the best here in New York City specializing in athletic shoulder injuries. I had exceptional Physical Therapy team rehab me. I have now SURPASSSED my pre-injury strength levels and I am beyond thrilled at my results from this surgery.YEAH! If anybody needs a referral to my surgeon here in Manhattan, feel free to email me. GOod luck and remember if your are going to have surgery, do your homework and find the best surgeon. AND FOLLOW YOUR PT PROTOCOL to help your recovery. The steroids arent necessary and could present unfortunate problems in your future. Good Luck [email protected]
     
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