Shoulder1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Shoulder News
Feature Story
Shoulder Technology
Real Life Recoveries
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
 Shoulder  Hero™
Dr. Evan Flatow:
Innovating Shoulder Surgery
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion in  Our Forums
 Community
Shoulder1 Forums
Patient Stories
Shoulder Journals
 Reference
Ask an Expert
FAQ's
Locate a Doctor
Reference Library
Anatomy
Video Library
 Bookmark Us
 
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
August 21, 2017  
SHOULDER NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Links/Reprints
  • arthritis

    Protein Appears to Protect Against Bone Loss in Arthritis


    September 16, 2014

    Source: Georgia Regents University

    A small protein named GILZ appears to protect against the bone loss that often accompanies arthritis and its treatment, researchers report.

    Arthritis as well as aging prompt the body to make more fat than bone, and the researchers have previously shown GILZ can restore a more youthful, healthy mix. It also tamps down inflammation, a major factor in arthritis.

    Now they have early evidence that GILZ might one day be a better treatment option for arthritis patients than widely used synthetic glucocorticoids, which actually increase bone loss, said Dr. Xingming Shi, bone biologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University.

    Their research is being presented at The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 2014 Annual Meeting Sept. 12-15 in Houston.

    In addition to bone loss, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, produce other side effects, including diabetes. While GILZ is induced by glucocorticoids, directly overexpressing the protein appears to better target sources of bone loss and inflammation and avoid these serious side effects. .

    For this study, the focus was tumor necrosis factor alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine that helps regulate immune cells and is a major player in arthritis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha primarily works though promoting inflammation, which is great if the target is cancer. However, when tumor necrosis factor alpha becomes dysregulated, it can also cause diseases like arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    To look specifically at the impact on bone loss, the researchers crossed mice bred to overexpress tumor necrosis factor alpha throughout the body with mice that overexpressed GILZ in just their mesenchymal stem cells. These stem cells produce the osteoblasts, which make bone. They also make fat, and when the cells stop making as much bone, they tend to make more of it. Shi's lab has shown that GILZ can coax mesenchymal stem cells back to making more bone and less fat.

    While the mice that overexpressed only tumor necrosis factor alpha quickly developed arthritis along with significant bone and weight loss, those that also overexpressed GILZ had significantly less bone loss, Shi said.

    "Our previous studies have shown that the GILZ transgenic mouse can make more bone," said Dr. Nianlan Yang, MCG postdoctoral fellow. "We wanted to see if GILZ would still have a bone protective effect in an inflammatory environment similar to arthritis."

    Next steps include developing an oral medication, a peptide specifically, that increases GILZ expression rather than the genetic alterations the researchers have used in animal models, said Yang. She just completed a National Arthritis Foundation fellowship, which helped support that effort. They also want to see if GILZ can prevent arthritis from developing in the face of inflammation.

    Glucocorticoids and GILZ are both produced naturally in the body. Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that help regulate the body's use of the fuel glucose and dampen the immune response.

    Discuss in the Shoulder1 forums

    Photo: Aouni Tahech

    Last updated: 16-Sep-14

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Shoulder1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Surgery A Treatment Option For Young Patients With Shoulder Injuries

    Recommendations For Tablet Computer Use To Avoid Shoulder Pain

    3-D Motion Detection System Could Prevent Shoulder Injuries In Baseball Pitchers

    New IDSA Guidelines Aim To Reduce Death, Disability And Cost Of Prosthetic Joint Infections

    Biceps Tenodesis Hastens Recovery From Shoulder Injuries

    Previous 5 Features ...

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    Interview with Dr. Patel: Roles for arthroscopic surgery in osteoarthritis/hip resurfacing

    Interview with Dr. Patel: The Reasons for Back Pain and Diagnostic Methods

    Interview with Dr. Prodromos: High Tibial Osteotomy 1

    More Features ...
     
    Related Content
    Healthy Diet = Healthy Joints

    Arthritis Foundation Announces Top 10 Arthritis Research Advances of 2003

    Hormonal Imbalance and RA Link Studied

    VIOXX No Longer An Option For Those Suffering from Shoulder Pain

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.