Basamania Clavicle Surgery Report

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Topic Title: Basamania Clavicle Surgery Report
Created On: 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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JOHNNYO

Posts: 187

Please contact me with any helpful information. My collarbone is an inch shorter, and crooked. It is pulling my shoulder cockeyed, and affecting my neck and spine and scapulothoracic joint. It has greatly affected my life, and left me quite disabled. I can't move around too much because it pulls my spine and neck out of whack. Saying that shortening of the clavicle has no consequences is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard in my life. Please contact me with any helpful information; What doctor understands that shorteing of the clavicle can have severe effects ? What doctor is willing to fic it ? I have seen a lot of doctors ("specialists") that have this idea that clavicle shortening and angulation have no effects. Some of these doctors were supposedly specialists in clavicles also. What a nightmare. I am suffering day and night, for over 2&1/2 years. The bone is so much shorter it keeps my shoulder pulled in, and affects my neck and spine. Please share any helpful information !! Thank You Johnny
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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JOHNNYO

Posts: 187

I had a distal clavicle fracutre over 2 years ago. The bone healed crooked, and over an inch shorter - "L" shaped; shaped like a golf club. I have had a difficult time finding a doctor to understand how the shortened clavicle pulls my shoulder cockeyed - it keeps my scapula pulled crooked. It is affecting my neck and spine. My shoulder is stuck forward, from the collarbone being so much shorter. It affects my neck and spine. It is very easy to see how it is pulling my upper body crooked. There are medical studies that say shortening doesn't matter; I think that is a bunch of hogwash. The shorter the clavicle, the more the shoulder is going to be cockeyed. If shortening doesn't matter, then why do people with shorter clavicles complain of these symptoms, and go from doctor to doctor with the same frustration ? Those studies that say shortening doesn't matter are a bunch of hogwash. They take the patients input, and turn it into statistics, then generate output to prove whatever they want to prove. I guarantee that no orthopedic surgeon who produced those studies, has a shortened clavicle. The shorter the clavicle, the more it can pull your shoulder out of whack, affecting the neck and spine, and nerves and blood vessels; leading to numbness, tingling, lack of circulation, neck and spine problems. Is there anyone who has experienced this nightmare scenario ? Please contact me with your input and experiences. The more people we can get together with these experiences, the more likely this ridiculous notion can be banished, and we can help doctors open their eyes to this complication that is ruining lives. Please contact me with your experiences and thoughts. Thank You Johnny
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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JOHNNYO

Posts: 187

Does Dr. Basamania only use the PIN, or does he do other types as well ? I have a distal clavicle malunion over two years now; bone is much shorter, keeping my shoulder stuck in and very painful on my neck; suffering bad; can't even move around too much anymore. I would like to get it fixed. I am wondering if Dr. Basamania does other types also ? I have seen a lot of doctors who just didn't know what to do, but the bone is shorter and crooked - "L" shaped, and it is very painful and exausting. I would like to have the osteotomy to correct it. Does Dr. Basamania do these types as well?
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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CKB

Posts: 13

Just an update on my surgery from Dec. 2003. I have not had the pin taken out yet, but I have recovered to better than I was before surgery. I can sleep on that side with no problem, roll around, lift my arm to about 135 degrees before any discomfort. I am not 100% yet, although I expect to get very close. I wouldn't try anything high impact just yet, but I am feeling very good. I do have one little nerve issue left, I have good sensitvity in my thumb, but sometimes I have a hard time telling if I am squeezing something. Like if you trying to start a nut onto a bolt. It is not life altering. Since the original fracture in Aug. 2002 it has been a long road, but I am glad I found Dr. Basamania to do that surgery.
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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ying

Posts: 6

I had my surgery done on 7/24/03 and have it taken out on 4/7/04. I have almost everything back except a little problem to bring up my arm sideway beyond 90 degrees. I'm not sure if this is caused by the re-injury in this January - I was thrown and hit the other guy's kneel cap in a Jujitsu class, the pin was bent but the bone was not broken. I guess it probably will take a while for me to have a full recovery. I think I'm lucky to keep the pin in there longer than the regular 22 weeks, from the way the pin was bent, I think the bone could be easily broken with that impact. It's a pleasant experience. Not much of the post-op care. I would not hesitate to recommend Dr. Basamania to anyone who needs the clavicle surgery.
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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CKB

Posts: 13

I had Dr Basamania do my surgery at Duke in Dec 2003. My insurance would not cover it and it looks like the bill may end up being around $14,000.
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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clavicle maddness

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how much outof pocket will it cost me to repair a clavicle that has healed crooked
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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Grahame ausie

Posts: 3

I broke my clavicle 5 mths ago and am still in pain. This however has not stopped me playing sport. Spoke to a Dr yesterday and he got me an appointment with a specialist, I believe that the break was clise to the A/C and there is a non union, and skin, flech betweek the ends of the bone. Whats your opinion on sergery, a plate and screws or the bolt
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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Beldrueger

Posts: 25

I meant to reply more often, but a thesis, graduation, moving, a new job, etc, etc ... it all gets in the way. I apologize to those who have sent me e-mails and I have left hanging. I have had several follow-ups. My bone is healing perfectly. I still have some numbness, but I work out, bike, and play drums constantly. I never have any pain, only occasional tingles in my fingers. There seems to be permanent nerve damage from the original fracture. I have not had the pin removed, and I am a bit overdue. I'm in Dallas now, and with a new job, it is hard to find the time. There are no specialists in Dallas who can do the operation. I don't notice the pin. Other people have complained of pain from the pin, but I never have any pain. I forget that it is there. I would recomend the surgery to anyone. I only wish that I had done it immediately after the fracture. 3+ months after surgery and I am living life as I was before the fracture. Who knows how long that would have taken without surgery.... It is testimony enough that I haven't had the pin removed. I haven't scheduled the appointment because I simply never think about the fracture. That is another reason that I have not reposted in this board. Before the surgery I thought about it every day. It was a sharp point trying to pierce my skin that I simply could not ignore. It was ruining my quality of life. Nowadays everything is back to normal. That alone justifies the surgery to me.
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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ying

Posts: 6

After contacted driegfras@msn.com in May, I decided to see Dr. Basamania for my non-union collar bone. I had my surgery done on 7/23/03, no pain, other than Tylenol, I did not have any need to take pain killers. I live in Baltimore, it takes me about 6 hours to get North Carolina, but the trip is worth it. I'm very glad I made the trip and would recommend Dr. Basamania to anyone who needs the surgery. I would not add anything more than driegfras@msn.com to bore you, the whole experience has been great. Below are some links about the surgery and Dr. Basamania, the last link has a lot of general broken clavicle info: Basamania's resume: http://surgery.mc.duke.edu/orthopaedics/Basamania.htm Surgery procedure: http://www.ortho-u.net/orthoo/5100.htm news release: http://www.sciencedaily.com/re...01/04/010418071716.htm John's clavicle page: http://www.jpy.com/john/clavicle/
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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Beldrueger

Posts: 25

4/30 - One Week Follow-up Not much to say. Hardly any pain. Stopped taking painkillers on Monday. Have not been taking Tylenol or anything. Stitches come out on Friday. I will report on the visit. Have made several long walks (~2mi) with only minor pain. Occasional shooting pains at the incision sites that I think might be from the stitches ... I've never had stitches before. Otherwise feel great. Been working hard finishing my Thesis. BTW for anyone wondering about the cost ... it's a good thing my insurance covered it because out of pocket cost is about $10K.
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 05/21/2005 09:17 AM

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Beldrueger

Posts: 25

This morning I flew back in town from Duke. On Wednesday (4/24) I had my clavicle pinned by Dr. Basamania. I would recomend this surgery to anyone with complications. For surgery summary, skip to the last several paragraphs. I initially broke my collarbone on Dec 28th in Dallas,TX. I was put in a figure of eight brace and saw an ortho doctor who told me that it should heal fine and that hardly any clavicle fractures ever require surgery. I immediately started doing research and found numerous articles indicating that a large percent of clavicle never fully heal and cause permanent complications such as Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. I thought that I would fall in the lucky category, so I waited it out. One of the tell-tale signs that I only later found out to be indicative of a particularly bad fracture is that I had a great deal of skin discoloration all along the right side of my chest. It looked quite jaundiced. The discoloration faded after about 5 weeks. Right before I saw a doctor again, this time in Boston Since then, I have seen the doctor twice more, and always get the same story. "Wait a few more months. Surgery is only a last resort. It looks like it is healing." I was never happy with this story so at the end of March I went to see Dr. Basamania. I was already sold on the surgery, and Dr. Basamania gave me such a good feeling that I left incredibly excited. Of course, I had to wait one more month before the actual surgery. Over the past 4 months I have had very good bone growth, but my clavicle has healed with a pretty severe malunion. It had not fully fused. I still had severe fatigue when my arm went unsupported for more than 15-20 minutes at a time, and I had severely reduced bloodflow to my arm. IT was so bad that I woke up 2-3 times every night with my arm painfully asleep. After 4 months I could still not lift heavy weight or ride a mountain bike. Now to the surgery. First off, Duke has a beautiful campus and huge medical facilities. It is inspiring even on approach. The day started at 8:30 AM with Pre-op, involving blood tests and screening. I must note that everything occured almost exactly as scheduled. I had very little waiting. At 11:30, I arrived at the Ambulatory Surgery Center. After getting undressed, the first step was to meet with the anaesthesiologists. I had a team of three doctors administering my anaesthesia. Before coming to Duje, I was a little apprehensive about local anaesthetic, but all my worries were for naught. They use a nerve block. This basically means that they block all nerve signals to the surgery area, and in this case, the whole right arm as well. They simply apply anaesthesia directly to the trunk of the nerve at a very precise location on your neck. It blocks more than just the clavicle area. Besides the clavicle and shoulder area my ear, arm, diaphraghm, larynx(sp?)and three fingers were completely dead ... and I mean dead. You could have cut my arm off and I would not have noticed. Two interesting side effects are that 1)With the larynx essentially paralyzed you become very hoarse and can only whisper 2)With the diaphragm paralyzed you can't burp ... which is important when they offer you a drink in the recovery room .. avoid sodas. After installing the nerve block they fed me some sort of happy juice so that I was not fully conscious, although I was awake for at least 40% of the actual surgery. No pain, trust me, no pain at all. I even remember hearing them hammering and grinding ... thinkin "hmmm that's kind of cool ... almost seems like they are hammering someone else" The rest is a bit hazy, but I do remember them commenting before surgery that my clavicle growth was a bit unusual in that it had grown together a bit concave or bowed in. I stayed overnight, and the recovery rooms in the ASC are very nice. I even got a corner room with huge windows. I must comment at this point that all of the staff down there was simply amazing. I have never had such a good experience. I did not meet one doctor or nurse that I did not like ... and I have met many that I didn't like elsewhere. One nurse even bought me two Twix from the vending machine out of her own pocket. They kept the neve block in me all night, but with a lower dosage of medicine. The medications that they fed me overnight worked well and I had no trouble sleeping. After getting off the nerve block and heading back to the hotel, I was a bit uncomfortable for awhile, but today I feel like a champ. I little bit of discomfort, but nothing major. I have not worn a brace since I left the hospital. I have no problem dressing or doing most activities. There is only a little bit of stiffness. There is no pain that would prevent me from doing most things, and most of the restraint in movement is self imposed ... I mean it has only been 2 days! The best thing is that there is no fatigue. I have been typing at the computer for over 3 hours (working on my thesis), and I have no muscle fatigue. Only a week ago, I could not do that. I am extremely happy ... just beeming. Dr. Basamania advised against raising my arm above my shoulder for at least a month. I take the bandages off on Sunday, but only so that I can clean the wound and put on new dressings. The stiches will come out after about 10 days during my first follow-up with a local doctor. At that point, I plan to return to lower body cardiovascular activity ... such as stationary bike. In 3-4 weeks I will get x-rays taken and sent to Dr. Basamania. He will then evaluate how long the pin should stay in. He seemed to indicate that 3 months should be a conservitavely long time. Others have had them out as soon as a month .. but I'll go with conservative. I plan to start biking again in 6-8 weeks, but that depends on the consultation with Basamania. From the postings I have read about other surgery methods, I think that the Basamania's method is vastly superior. It has a shorter recovery time, better success rate, less scarring, and less chance of complications. I would recomend it to anyone. I just wish that I had it done the day after breaking my clavicle ... I would be doing handstands by now.
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