Ream & Run Last Tuesday

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Topic Title: Ream & Run Last Tuesday
Created On: 07/30/2012 06:44 PM

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 07/28/2013 08:14 AM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

fully agree with RuinedShoulder. Ream and run is your only valid option to get back in the game. I've had the procedure on my right arm and do all the things you describe. I'm 52. I've seen the documents you mentioned, but they are useless for our consideration. A team of surgeons performed various procedures on a number of patients. Ream and run did not look good in comparison, because they performed it on patients with other underlying conditions, such birth defects and severe osteoporoses, that would disqualify them from having the procedure in the first place. Dr. Matsen will perform a number of tests and determine if you are a candidate for ream and run. If he says yes, and you follow his instructions to a t, your chances for a full recovery are very good. FullROM
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 07/25/2013 04:02 AM

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ruinedshoulder

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If you want to go back to rigorous athletic acitivy, the Ream and Run seems to be the only option. I would get in contact with Dr. Matsen, he writes a blog at shoulderarthritis.blogspot.com. The only doctors who are unsure of the operation seem to be doctors who don't do it, it's a highly technical procedure.
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 07/22/2013 07:41 PM

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NOKARND51

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Hello I am a 51 year old male who is suffering the degeneration of both shoulders, their situations may be slightly different, and the left worse at present, but that's prone to change I suppose.I have had a hip re-surfaced in 2004 with the BHR hardware and it has been a big success. I researched the procedure by seeking others who had the experience. Now I'm seeking those who have worn out their shoulders and are back to full-power type activities via some sucessful surgery by a great surgeon. According to the xrays I have diminishing /or missing joint space in the shoulders and I'm feeling it. I want to continue to bench press, do dips and chins, grapple and hit the heavy bag hard. At present I would not opt for any work that would fail on me if I "pushed the envelope".As the Irishman in Braveheart said, "I've come to right place eh?"Any advice anyone? Comebacks and success's?I"m hearing "ream and run" but apparently some docs disagree?Thanks for any interest.
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 03/06/2013 10:13 AM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Sasha, Please email me at [email protected] We'll go from there.
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 03/05/2013 10:29 PM

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Dowhayka

Posts: 3

Do you have a phone number or a skype address that I can reach you at? I would like to speak with you about this potential procedure. Thank you! - Sasha D
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 03/05/2013 01:10 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Sasha, I typed in a hurry. I noticed the bad grammar after I submitted. I'm embarressed by it. Hope you understand what I'm trying to say.Thanks,FullROM50
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 03/05/2013 01:07 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Hi Sasha D.,Ream and Run is only performed by very few doctors. It is a procedure designed to let an athlete with severy OA to get back into the game (no matter what the game is). It is also designed to outlast other TSR and other approaches. This is why I choose it. It is unfortunate that your Laterjet treatment resulted in OA. My son recently had this procedure done, and he is doing well with it. I've had ream and run performed a little over three years ago, and I'm very pleased. My ROM and strength are perfect. I perform competitive judo, fitness training and a variety of horse disciplines. I'll be glad to answer your questions.Best regards,FullROM50
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 02/17/2013 12:56 PM

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Dowhayka

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I am a 24 year old male former athlete who has a history of recurrent dislocations. I was treated in 2008 with a bankart repair that last until 2012 when I dislocated my shoulder again. The surgeon that I saw performed a coracoid osteotomy known as a Latarjet procedure. The two screws that were inserted into my glenohumeral joint resulted in severe OA of the humerous as well as some changes to posterior and anterior glenoid. The coracoid osteotomy indicates no significant purchase into the glenoid cavity despite the screw insertion. As a result of this, I met with a surgeon in Toronto who told me that a Total Shoulder Replacement would be my only option at this point. I'm not sure if this surgeon has heard of the Ream and Run. I've done a generous amount of research and was wondering if I could get some opinions on the matter and maybe contact someone who had a Ream and Run procedure done that might have been in a similar situation to myself. Any opinions on the matter would be greatly appreciated. Cheers!-Sasha D.
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 09/10/2012 07:57 AM

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retupmoc1

Posts: 5

quote:
Originally posted by: FullROM50
I would continue 5x for at least 12 weeks.



Thanks for the feedback and congrats on your success story!

Yes, I'm going to do that as much as possible. I travel 2 weeks out of each month, but still think I can work in at least 3 sessions a day on the road and 5 on the days I'm home (I work from home those days). It's coming along nicely, but it just doesn't feel ready to stop the frequent PT. And heck, it only takes a few minutes, so why not?

I've added some very light strength training, too. I was able to shoulder press a 5 lb dumbell yesterday almost straight up. I haven't been able to do that for at least 4 years!

retupmoc1
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 09/04/2012 10:24 AM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81


retupmoc1,
Awesome progress!! Glad you're recovery is going so well. I would continue 5x for at least 12 weeks. I did that and fully recovered; meaning my operated shoulder is identical to my non-arthritic left shoulder in ROM and strength. I made rehab an important part of my life, and still do the exercises regularly two and a half years later. While that may not be necessary, I feel better about it and we're supposed to exercise anyway.

Best,
FullROM50
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 09/03/2012 02:23 PM

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retupmoc1

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It's now been 6 weeks since my R&R surgery, and the progress continues. My ROM has increased a bit more, and I find I'm using my shoulder for more and more "normal" activities without even thinking about it.

The pain level is now generally very low, and most of the day and night I really don't have any pain at all. My therapy exercises are usually pretty easy except the supine stretch, which my wife helps me with. According to the general plan, I can now go to 2x a day instead of 5, but I just don't think I'll do that yet. Can't hurt to continue working on the flexibility. I plan to add very light strength training, too.

To give you some idea of the progress:
  • Before surgery: Arm raise to the side - couldn't raise it up to even with my shoulder
  • Now - can raise it past shoulder level with no assistance, 30+ degrees above my shoulder if I push a little with my other arm.
  • Before: Arm raise in front - could raise it only to shoulder level
  • Now: At least 45 degrees above shoulder level, 70 - 75 degrees with a little help from my other arm.
  • Before: Found it almost impossible to sleep on my left side (that's the operated side) or even my right side. This was the final straw in pushing me to have the surgery done.
  • Now: I can sleep on my left side, and my right side is becoming easier and easier.
  • Before: Sometimes just sitting still in a recliner if I made the slightest move, I'd get a really sharp bone-on-bone reminder of how bad the shoulder was.
  • Now: Its motion is very smooth most of the time and those sudden unexpected stabbing pains are gone.

I'm not saying it's all jelly beans and rainbows. There's a long way to go before I'll be lugging heavy stuff around or weight training again. Some days that first therapy session in the morning is still pretty tough. And sometimes I forget I'm still recovering and grab something heavy or pull something toward me a little too aggressively and regret it for a few seconds, but considering that only 6 weeks ago part of my shoulder was sawed off, reamed out, and replaced, I'm still stoked about the progress!




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 08/29/2012 10:44 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Hi mblock66,
You're right, you are fairly young for shoulder replacement. So you're going to wait and wait, and maybe in 10 years there is something worth trying, but there won't be historical data for another 10 years. So, maybe you want to wait 20 years. (Then you would actually be a little older than I am now.)

You're an athlete and should be enjoying the activities you love. (For me it was mostly judo.) I can assure you, I'm not even aware of the metal ball. I grapple with athletes in their early to late 20s with full competitive interaction, take falls and throw them. And yes, I can throw a ball overhand quite far and can stay in a handstand a few second. (Then my wrists start hurting.)

When the humeral head and/or glenoid are deteriorated beyond a certain point, there are very few options, period. But in your case (an mine) there is only one. It's called ream and run by Dr. Matsen or one of his fellows. I've read many of the concerns, but none are convincing. If you're motivated, like you said, you'll do very well. The longevity of this procedure for otherwise healthy patients with good rotator cuffs is tremendous. There are patients younger than you who've had it. A lot depends on your motivation to do the rehab, but I don't think you'd have a problem with that. Feel free to email me, if you have personal questions. [email protected].

Sorry, if I'm too direct about this issue, but I went to see many surgeons myself who pretty much told me the same thing about the limitations and I would have to deal with another replacement in about 15 years, especially if I use the joint a lot. So, you're supposed to use the joint to keep the muscles toned, but not a lot, because it wears down the plastic. Also know several individuals who had conventional surgeries by famous doctors, and can't lift their arm to comb their hair, or are in continuous pain.

Dr. Matsen's records speak for themselves. If he says you are a candidate for ream and run, then you are, regardless of your age. Most importantly, I would refrain from having any more surgeries until you're ready for the ream and run.

This is what I honestly believe. I'm not a PR guy for Dr. Matsen; just a patient who has made a FULL recovery.

Best, FullROM50



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 08/23/2012 04:41 PM

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mblock66

Posts: 20

This is great news about your ream and run. I am 34 male with two failed shoulder surgeries. Last was almost 2 years ago with Dr Gerald Williams at the Rothman Institute in Philly. I am extremely active but have very little internal and external rotation and my whole shoulder / trap lifts when I get to a certain point in overhead movement.

I am in pain all the time but I worked my TAIL off in PT and exercise. I still work out 6 days a week, lift weights and I attempt to swim once and a while but it is just so hard. I was a division 1 competative swimmer through college.

I just recently started to have some email conversations with Dr Matsen looking to get his opinion on a ream and run for me. We have had some mild back and forth and I sent all of my post op reports and recent MRI analysis to him for review. I just don't get the feeling that I have his full attention yet or that he really knows if it is a good fit (i.e. this one will actually work). I read about people like you and ROM50 that really promote him and the surgery but I am just so hesitant to go through another year of this just to be disappointed again. I would really love to keep hearing how you progress and if you feel the surgery was a success.

I am also nervous about putting a metal ball in my shoulder at my age especially with where the medical world may go in the next 5 years (stem cells).

Im in a really tough place but it is always good to get feedback from people that have gone through it first hand.

Thanks!
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 08/19/2012 10:40 AM

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marconi50

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I'm following your posts because I will be having TSR the end of October. It's scary because I have read so many stories of less than successful results. I notice that most of those are from reverse replacement which I don't think I will be getting. Plan on talking with doctor about this ream and run proceedure. Haven't researched it yet but I'm planning on it as soon as I log off here. Hopefully my surgery will be simple because it's not from trauma, just good old fashioned arthritis. I'm 61 and moderately active even with the bum shoulder. Just looking forward to not having constant pain and hopefully increase my ROM. Can't take anti-inflamitories anymore due to stomach issues caused by them. Looking forward to reading about your progress.
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 08/06/2012 09:39 PM

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retupmoc1

Posts: 5

It's been 2 weeks now, and I'm pleased. Both the ROM and pain level from the PT sessions have improved nicely.

In terms of degrees of movement, it's increased maybe 5 to 10 degrees putting me at about 155/160 for the 3 stretching exercises. Even better than the ROM increase is the ease with which I can do the exercises. Most of the trembling in the arm when approaching an extreme is gone, and the pulley exercise is just plain easy now. I know there will be ups and downs, and the supine stretch is still very painful, but the first 2 weeks have been encouraging!

Also, I got the staples out today. That was a real milestone. Now I can shower without a bandage shield, and the ice bags are even more effective.

On a side note, the only hassle in the whole process so far was convincing my PCP to remove the staples! Unbelievable. I'm not going to rant because she finally agreed, but I will say my first appointment with a new PCP is next week.

As for the pain level, it's not generally too bad. Some days it just won't stop aching and I take low doses of Oxycodone all day and at night. Other days I have periods as long as 6 to 8 hrs when I don't need any pain relief at all. I'm hoping it levels off soon. Also, as I mentioned before, I was surprised how much more effective ice is now with even that thin bandage that was over the staples gone. And, as much as it may sometimes hurt, if I throw in a light extra PT session, that sometimes takes the aching down at least a notch, sometimes more.

I know this site isn't super-active, but I'll keep posting as time goes on. Posts from others here helped solidify my decision about which procedure and Dr. to use, and I hope my posts will do the same for someone else in the future.

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 08/05/2012 07:40 AM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Congratulations Steve, you've made a wise choice going with Dr. Matsen. Good luck with the rehab. Strict adherence to the program is very important. I've continued the exercises to this day, and my shoulder is doing great. FullROM50
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 08/03/2012 12:01 PM

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ohboy

Posts: 48

Thanks for the update Steve. Please keep us posted on your progress. Congratulations on your new shoulder!
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 07/30/2012 06:44 PM

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retupmoc1

Posts: 5

I can't believe it finally happened! I've been scheduled since March and the time went so slowly. Now I'm a week post-op and pretty happy so far (and not just due to the pain meds!)

Dr. Matsen said the surgery went well and they were able to get a tight, well-aligned fit. Prior to the surgery, the glenoid was almost flat and the top of the sphere of the humeral head was worn down to the point that the top fourth of the head was essentially truncated . Also, the new head had to be offset about a quarter of an inch to align correctly.

So bottom line? The motion is very smooth. No popping or tight spots. The required 150 degrees of motion is painful to achieve in all the exercises I have to do, but I'm doing it and hoping to make 160 by week's end. The hardest part is to relax and push some more when the pain is at its worst!

Other details: I'm a 53 y/o man who has always been very active. I began having trouble with the shoulder when I was in my late 30s. The real pain started when I was in my mid 40s.

I live in the southeast, so I went for the "one-stop" plan with the Ortho clinic in WA. This means meet with Dr. Matsen and others on Monday, surgery Tuesday, released Thursday, fly home Saturday. Worked out flawlessly.

I'll be glad to answer any questions.

Steve




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