Progress after reverse total shoulder

< REFRESH >
Topic Title: Progress after reverse total shoulder
Created On: 04/12/2012 11:27 PM

Pages: [ << 1 2 3 4 5 >> Previous Next ]
View topic in raw text format.

Bookmark and Share

 10/06/2012 04:53 PM

Author Icon
jakmak52

Posts: 11






i had the 1st hemiplasty 10 years ago with humeral head replaced with a tapered ball,5 years later the ball replacement started to unscrew itself , so i needed the traditional replaced because the new humeral head started eroded the bottom half of the glenoid and riding up into achromian with a low grade infection . so I hope thr 3rd time is the charmer J


    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 04:34 PM

Author Icon
jakmak52

Posts: 11

I had a reverse this time because of the previous 2 failed tradtitional implants. hope this does the
trick!!

jack
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 04:28 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

quote:
Originally posted by: ohboy

Is simply "giving up already" even an option in your mind? Can you live comfortably?


My shoulder is so mangled and scarred from 5 surgeries in rapid succession that it may not be a choice. My local surgeon refuses to touch me again, although he is doing follow up for me. Other surgeons have refused to see me after I had 2 surgeries as they don't want to get involved with messy issues. That is straight from the doctor's mouths. I have no idea what more they could do. Guess I will find out when I go back to Boston. I am very grateful he will continue to try to find a solution. Yes, it is constant pain.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 04:16 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

What did you have done? Reverse or fusion?
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 03:19 PM

Author Icon
jakmak52

Posts: 11


Well it's been 6 days post op and doing ok so far. Excuse the spelling and grammar errors do to only one arm to use. They gave me this strange looking immobilizer that's a pain in the ass to take on & off even with assistance. They wanted me to use the cold therapy system that recyclcles the cold water for 2 weeks at 125.00 rental fee!! It’s hard to dress & undress. I’m on dilaudid & Fentnyl for pain management and works very well. I sleep on my back which is inconvenient for me. He told me no pt for 3 months so the muscle & bone to heal properly. The biggest nuisance is the constipation from the pm. I take Ducolax & milk of magnesia. Well that’s all for now. Hope very else is doing well.



Jack
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 02:27 PM

Author Icon
ohboy

Posts: 48

A fracture of the glenoid is a very rare fracture indeed. Usually people who suffer such a fracture are involved in serious impact accidents such as car crashes or motorcycle accidents. The fractured glenoid is usually the least of their worries. You would think I must have wrapped myself around a tree but, much to my embarrassment, I simply fell over with the ski pole strapped to my wrist. As I fell my arm was held up in the air as the pole was stuck in the snow. The weight of my body probably started to dislocate my shoulder, but the glenoid fractured instead. Coincidentally, I was staying with two doctors that weekend (one an ER doc) and it was suggested that I wait for a few weeks to see a doctor. I didn't wait to make an appointment, but it was two weeks to see a shoulder specialist. In the mean time I went skiing the next weekend and traveled for business. Smart!

Anyway when the orthopedist saw the X-ray, he immediately put me in a sling for 4 weeks. The bone was only moderately displaced, looked to be anatomically correct and there was no apparent soft tissue damage so they let it heal without surgery. Unfortunately I ended up with bilateral frozen shoulder and had surgery 5 months later to fix that. It has been a tough, painful road and I was worrying that the ongoing pain was due to post traumatic arthritis. Given the rapid improvement lately, I think it was just (not to minimize the hell of FS) frozen shoulder. I hope to dodge the arthritis bullet and will do anything to minimize the chances.

Is simply "giving up already" even an option in your mind? Can you live comfortably?
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 01:44 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

You are right, Ohboy - no help from me on this one! What did they do for you? How weird to have a fracture in the glenoid. Did you have any soft tissue damage? I am a librarian, so have access to most journals - I read voraciously about this stuff and get it straight from the surgeons!
My glenoid was fine until I got that hemicap. My 3rd surgeon said it was misplaced, and ended up wearing away the glenoid until it was down to "eburnated" bone. All within a few months or less. The big problem now is the multiple-surgery issue. My second doc (he is local) advised to give it up already.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/06/2012 12:33 PM

Author Icon
ohboy

Posts: 48

Hi FullROM50 & misty3,

I have been reading your posts with interest because I also injured my shoulder in February of 2011 in a skiing accident. I fractured the glenoid in the right shoulder. I probably don't need to tell you what that is as I find most people on these boards have, through unfortunate necessity, a keen understanding of shoulder anatomy. Shortly after the fracture, which wasn't diagnosed until two weeks after the accident I came down with frozen shoulder. While I seem to be recovering from FS, I am aware of my increased risk of post traumatic arthritis due to the fracture. Ignorance would have been bliss, but my mind doesn't work that way and I discovered this risk through reading on the Internet.

While I have been told by my surgeon not to worry, that I am not destined to get GH arthritis and if i did it would likely be 20 years from now (i am 42), I wonder how much weight lifting I should do. I wonder if by lifting weights am I accelerating the degeneration or increasing my risk. I don't lift heavy weights and try to use good form (max 70 lbs on bench for example). Maybe this is a question for FullROM50, but do you have any insight into this issue? It seems you are a proponent of strengthening...especially after being diagnosed with arthritis. Did you receive this information from a doctor as well?

misty - I am rooting for your complete recovery. You have been through a lot and deserve some relief. Hang in there.

FullROM50 - thank you for being an inspiration to others.

ohboy
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/05/2012 10:33 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

I do think I've got a good doc now. I am in Ohio - CCF is not an option, so don't even go there! I rode last weekend, and want to go again this weekend. Love that little mare - got her last year just for her height, sturdy build, and good attitude. Anyway, I will be going back to Boston - we have not given up yet.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/05/2012 09:56 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

No doubt your injury makes your situation a lot different than mine. Though I injured my shoulder in my teenage years pretty badly, but didn't have a real issue until my mid forties. I believe if you had received the right treatment early things might not have gotten this bad. Jp Warner is a reputable surgeon, and I wish you good luck with your treatment from here forward. This is beyond my level of experience and knowledge. I don't know in which state you live, but want to invite you to ride with me, when you're doing well again. I live in central Kentucky, near Louisville.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/04/2012 07:48 AM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

Perhaps the difference lies in the fact that mine was a traumatic, acute rupture, and there was bone damage that quickly lead to traumatic arthritis. The first surgeon who did the RC repair said I would need a replacement, but he moved away, so never got to question him about it.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/03/2012 08:34 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

The horse I ride is only 14-1 tall, but very athletic and yet so well mannered and calm. As a two year old I already rode her bareback down the road with only a lead line and a halter. Attached is a picture of me riding her in a reining competition two weeks ago.

Hope you get good advice from the doctors you're seeing. I was wondering if anything could be done to strengthen the rotator cuff. I'm sure you read my previous posts. I exercised vigorously against limited ROM and constant pain, to get ready for r and r. I previously prepared for the Olympics, but this was harder. Just to give you an idea. The MRIs had shown degenerative tendon tissue, but two years later they didn't. Then I knew it was time for the big step. Sorry I was unable to attach the picture from my iPhone. I'll attach it later.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 09:17 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

I agree that in theory it makes sense. But when the rotator cuff is dysfunctional - not going to work. I bought a 14.1 hand buckskin mare. Easy to groom, get on and off and saddle with an English saddle. One thing all the docs agree with is that the shoulder is a disaster
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 08:50 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

Well, maybe a reverse is your best option. I heard you say that r and r does not work well for women, but I know of a girl that had it done and is doing well. Don't know your surgeon, but I'd be very careful about heading into a direction that you might regret even more. Even with a reverse You should still be able to ride. Good
Luck!
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 08:40 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

He would have gone straight to a reverse. Ream and run was not the answer to the traumatic damage I had. For being in the mid 50's, my health was remarkable for being excellent. No problems at all, fit, thin, active, employed. Women are disadvantaged with small joints and less shoulder overall strength. Jp Warner is my surgeon now. Even matsen does not recommend his r and r for women.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 07:35 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

I wouldn't give up just yet. Did you say you saw Dr. Matsen already in an earlier post? So you have had a hemi, which is a bad approach anyway. You also have a subscapularis that didn't heal and a biceps tendon that was reattached. Are you in good health otherwise? I have four horses and ride at every opportunity at least three times a week. I can fully understand you desire to get back in the saddle.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 05:38 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

I've had horses my entire adult life- 3 out back right now. I could ride, just not recommended, plus it is difficult to handle them now, having pain with movement and limited ROM. It was a horse related accident, of course. Had an ex-racer (STB) tied to the trailer, turned my back to him, he spooked, swung around, and whalloped me from the back. Went flying, and landed on my elbow on asphalt. Completely tore supraspinatus, part of infraspinatus, some damage to the labrum and compression fracture on humeral head. Diagnosis and treatment were delayed due to not being taken seriously. Acute injuries should be treated within a month, I didn't get to surgery for 4 months. Anyway, 3 years and 5 surgeries later... had RC repair, lysis of adhesions, bicep tenodesis, distal clavicle resection, a hemicap last summer (failed) and TSR in May, and it appears the subscap has failed. Humeral head is obviously displaced anteriorly, flexion is 80 degrees. It is beyond repair at this point - probably just salvage.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 10/02/2012 12:09 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

Misty3, What kind of equestrian disciplines do you participate in? How did your accident occur? Did your scapula get damaged? Or your rotator cuff? There should not be a reason why you couldn't go back to horseback riding. I rode horses up until the time of my surgery and got back on a horse four months later. Maybe you need to talk with my surgeon Dr. Moskal in Indiana. I would refrain from any further surgeries by the doctors you have seen. If that is not an option, then at least ask your doctor to put you in touch with people who have had the same type of surgery and ask them all the questions you have. Dr. Moskal had no trouble doing that. I talked with several of his patients who have had extremely debilitating arthritis in their shoulders, were about the same age as me and went back to their activities after about 12 weeks. After all the reading on line, this was the most convincing to me. Best regards, FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 09/29/2012 05:35 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

Homeplate, how are you doing?

I am seeing my regular doc and local surgeon this week. I am still waiting for the surgeon's word on the arthrogram, but he may be waiting for the culture results. If the subscap IS torn, I seriously do NOT want to get a reverse unless he can support my decision to continue horseback riding. I rode for the first time in a year after those 2 replacement surgeries. I am not going to give it up no matter how much pain I have as it hurts whether I do anything or not.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 09/24/2012 11:44 AM

Author Icon
ohboy

Posts: 48

Hello Misty3,

I am sending positive vibes your way! I hope you get some relief soon. Please keep us posted on your progress.

ohboy
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    

Bookmark and Share

Pages: [ << 1 2 3 4 5 >> Previous Next ]
View topic in raw text format.
< REFRESH >
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Shoulder News
Feature Story
Shoulder Technology
Real Life Recoveries
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
 Shoulder  Hero™
Dr. Evan Flatow:
Innovating Shoulder Surgery
About Heroes
 Community
Shoulder1 Forums
Patient Stories
Shoulder Journals
 Reference
Ask an Expert
FAQ's
Locate a Doctor
Reference Library
Anatomy
Video Library
 Bookmark Us
 
advertisement
Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
advertisement
© 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.