Progress after reverse total shoulder

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Topic Title: Progress after reverse total shoulder
Created On: 04/12/2012 11:27 PM

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 04/03/2013 07:26 AM

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misty3

Posts: 132

I am 4 weeks out from my reverse, still immobilized in a brace to allow the breaks to heal. I had an osteotomy to remove the tsr stem and the tuberosity broke during its removal. I lost all tendons but the teres minor, so do not know how this will play out. Just wondering how the other reverse folks are doing.
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 10/26/2012 11:25 PM

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misty3

Posts: 132

Both? Wow.
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 10/26/2012 05:47 PM

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jakmak52

Posts: 11

quote:
Originally posted by: misty3
What kind of muscle transfer?

From the Latisimis Dorsi and Pectoralis Major to the humereal head for stability.
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 10/26/2012 04:32 PM

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misty3

Posts: 132

What kind of muscle transfer?
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 10/26/2012 04:08 PM

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jakmak52

Posts: 11


3 weeks post op and things are much better than the 2 previous hemi caps. They had to due a muscle transfer due to massive scar tissue, arthritis, and low grade infection. I feel a lot of tightness and a dull aching sensation. I also was told that I don't need to wear the sling except when in public and sleeping. I ordered a cold therapy machine from Amazon which works great for pain relief. Doc says no formal PT till 3 months so that the muscle and bone can heal properly. News at 11. J


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 10/12/2012 02:52 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Hi ohboy,
Sorry for the delay. For me the the gauge as to how much strength is necessary has always been own weight exercises, such as push ups, sit ups, squats, pull ups to determine, if the body has enough strenght to support itself. How many reps of each is up to the individual, but I believe a healthy individual should try to maintain a basic level of fitness throughout his/her life. This includes cardio-fitness as well. I'm 51 and consider myself very fit. I exercise several times a week, but don't kill myself doing it. It's not that easy to describe, but all this conditions me to do the things I need to do around the farm that Misty3 described. I'm trying to do this year round. I've heard often that people don't do anything in the winter and then try to work in their garden in the spring and through their backs out. This is very preventable. If you like the gym, go the gym. I don't think it's necessary. You can use bungees and light weights and a mat in the basement. Combine that with some outside cardio work, and you can get very fit. This could be running, walking, hiking or occasionally, in my case, pitching hay or chopping firewood.

Hope you had a good meeting with your surgeon. Given your pain is slowly getting better, I hope you can make a full recovery without any further surgery. That is always the best.

FullROM50

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 10/09/2012 12:06 AM

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ohboy

Posts: 48

Hi FullROM50,

Thanks for the feedback. I agree heavy lifting can't be good...but how much is too much? Probably nobody knows...

Tomorrow I meet with an orthopedic surgeon I made an appointment with 3-4 weeks ago. This is not the same person who operated on me last year (communication wasn't his strong suit). Originally I was planning to discuss the ongoing pain, but given the recent improvements I will just ask him for his suggestions for a lifelong exercise plan. I don't get any exercise at work since I sit behind a desk, so my exercise/strengthening needs to come from the gym.

Thanks again and happy riding!

ohbboy


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 10/08/2012 06:12 AM

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misty3

Posts: 132

I need to find out what is actually going on. it seems that my clinical picture and radiological picture never add up. ex: obvious superior migration indicated a RC tear, but it was intact at surgery, now obvious clinical tests indicating subscap tear but ct scan indicates no tear (hard to read, though). Plus visually, there is anterior dislocation and of course pain. Maybe that is why the doc wants me back - definitely a challenge to figure out what the heck is going on. My local doc just shakes his head and tells me he won't touch me, his role is to order tests so I can have them done at home.
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 10/07/2012 09:29 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Hi Misty, you won't get an argument with me about the benefits of manual labor. Working with life stock is a great way to stay in good shape. I train horses professionally and do lots of the things you're describing and enjoy every bit of it. Yet, when your body shows wear in certain areas, training with bungees and light weights or just stretching can help get you back on track. Before my r & r I tied the bungees to the horse trailer and exercised before performances. You may say I'm crazy, which may be true, but it helped me stay sane, when the the pain got too bad. I hated taking NSADS. So I did the exercises at home, at work or in hotel rooms when I was on travel. YOu should give it a try, might do some good. Best, FullROM50
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 10/07/2012 07:05 PM

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gin

Posts: 20

Hi, have not seen you on for a while. How are things going? I hope you are still recovering nicely.
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 10/07/2012 07:03 PM

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gin

Posts: 20

That will set in as you get older, especially as your shoulder has been injured.................
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 10/07/2012 06:35 PM

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misty3

Posts: 132

I am glad I don't have degenerative arthritis - not that bad anyway - so won't have to deal with the other shoulder. And I'm grateful that my left arm is completely functional, AND that I now have a surgeon willing to work with me. Unfortunately I have to hop a plane to see him but it is worth it. I have never worked out in a gym in my life, but think that taking care of 3-4 horses at home counts for some heavy duty manual labor. Who needs to lift weights when you've got 40 pound feed bags, bales of hay, western saddles, fillled muck tubs, wheelbarrows, etc! Of course, I can't do that any more...
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 10/07/2012 12:39 PM

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FullROM50

Posts: 81

Hello Ohboy,
Thanks for the kind words. I want to give you my answer to your question, "Does exercise make my arthritic shoulder worse?"

To me there is no doubt, that proper exercise has tremendous benefits, at all stages of arthritis. God give us joints to move them, not to rest them. Over the years we have learned that long term immobilization is detrimental. Reading the various posts on this forum, we can conclude that damaged soft tissue is as
bad as cartilage or bone damage. A joint is comprised of all that. So, the properties of a healthy joint is good ROM and strength. If arthritic changes to the joint are showing on radiographs, the condition will progress with or without exercise. Though I've never been a fan of heavy lifting. It may be too hard on the joints. However, you can keep the soft tissue in good condition through regular moderate exercise. I will go as far as
saying that through reasonable exercise, good nutrition, enough rest, the effect of joint aging can be supressed tremendously. I have talked with many doctors about this issue. There are difference in opinion. I can tell you from my own experience that it is possible to keep the rotator cuff and the bigger shoulder muscles healthy, in spite of the arthritis. There is no absolute proof, but i'd like to think it slows the loss of cartilage, because of the movement. Looked at from another angle, we know that lack of movement has not shown to help slowing joint degeneration.

Best regards, FullROM50
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 10/07/2012 12:27 PM

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ohboy

Posts: 48

Understood.
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 10/07/2012 12:11 PM

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misty3

Posts: 132

NOt ready for that!! I am "only" 57.
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 10/07/2012 11:59 AM

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ohboy

Posts: 48

quote:
Originally posted by: misty3
I have pretty much given up and expect to live with what I have.


i know it is extreme...but if all else fails, can you do a shoulder fusion to at least reduce/eliminate the pain? I remember after 5 mons of frozen shoulder, nothing would have been off the table for me.

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 10/07/2012 09:32 AM

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misty3

Posts: 132

I have pretty much given up and expect to live with what I have. What else could possibly be done? I never expected a worse result after the TSR, so doubt anything else would help. As my first PT said 3 years ago - You're the unlucky one.
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 10/06/2012 09:11 PM

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ohboy

Posts: 48

quote:
Originally posted by: misty3

Yes, it is constant pain.


Sorry to hear you are suffering. Living in constant pain is horrible, i know, especially if it affects your sleep. I hope your trip to Boston brings you relief.


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 10/06/2012 07:45 PM

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jakmak52

Posts: 11

59 y/o











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 10/06/2012 06:38 PM

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misty3

Posts: 132

I do hope it works out for you. If I may be so bold, how old are you?
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