shoulder surgery

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Topic Title: shoulder surgery
Created On: 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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 05/21/2005 08:31 AM

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DHSARTIS1

Posts: 7

Sandy, I just read your story and I think you should look at surgery. I just went through my 2nd surgery last Thursday. My first was last May to repair a full and partial tendon tears in my Rotator Cuff and Bone Spurs. They put 2 screws in my arm for support and up until a month ago I was in full recovery with 90% shoulder motion. I must have done something stupid because one of the screws was backing out and pain started again and my shoulder motion went way down. This time they took that loose screw out, sewed up another tear and scraped some scar tissue off. I'm now only 4 days out from surgery and am typing this with both hands. Hopefully I'll be back at work next week since all I do is computer and phone work. With all the pain your having it is not going to get better on its' own and it sounds like you've tried everything and repair is needed. Just remember if you have it done start moving your arm as soon as possible afterwards so that you don't get frozen shoulder from lack of movement. The best way to do this is to start pengilum movement of the arm, just hang it down while slightly bending forward and start making small circular movements in both directions until the DR tells you to make more evasive movements. The recovery time is usually one year with about 1 to 3 months of physical therapy. Good Luck... Dave Siegel
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 05/21/2005 08:31 AM

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Sandy044

Posts: 1

Hi, I have had left shoulder pain,locks up. shoots pain across my collar bone ,up my neck,numbness in my hand.5+years now. Had a horse injury.Have seen Ortho DR. for shots, had nerve tests,xrays and lots of meds!I am an active 44 year old and I cant stand the pain anymore! my Dr. said I have rotary cuff tendinitous,and 5 years aco my xrays showed a big gap and little cartlidge.I live on 4 tylonal p.m. nightly just to sleep.The shot gave me some relief for 1 week only. I have had 3 major back surgeries for ruptured discs and I also have fibro and osteoarheritis.My shoulder pain is overwhelming the other problems!!! Should I look into surgery? I dont want to live on meds because I am really into health and execise! Any input would be welcomed! Thanks, Sandy
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 05/21/2005 08:31 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

I was 51. I have been taking anti-inflamatory drugs for too long to remember, and my stomach has finally rebelled and now I'm on Vioxx (great!!). I have severe spinal degeneration, a wrist they want to fuse due to no cartiledge, a bum knee that was so-so and then developed a staph aureas infection after a simple arthroscopy. My shoulder is probably the most bothersome at the present time because now I have "grown" a rather large lump on the front side of the top of my shoulder. I am having a MRI next week. At first, the Dr's thought it was a Lipoma, but it has grown and I am rather concerned about it. I am unable to sleep comfortably.After the shoulder surgery I didn't "attend" PT much as they only gave me printed out exercises. I found that the one of holding a light weight over your head while laying flat on the floor, and then writing the alphabet helped a lot. Water exercise helped and continues to help a lot. Stretch bands help. If I believed that I would only be "out of commission" for several weeks, I would have a shoulder replacement in a heart beat, but the down time makes me quite apprehensive along with the foreign metal or plastic inside my body. I pray for someone to go into my nose or ear and regenerate cartiledge and insert it in all the places where I have no cartiledge. Pain is an every day all day experience. I have been deemed "permanenty disabled" since 2000 (age 50!!). Losing weight and exercising (as complete range of motion as possible) daily PLUS Vioxx is the only way to survive, at least for me.
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 05/21/2005 08:31 AM

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bpant

Posts: 6

I forgot to ask you a few questions. I will understand if you do not want to respond to any or all of them. How old were you when you had the surgery? How long has it been since your surgery? Who did the surgery? Do you need to do any special care now, such as taking anti-inflammatory medication, or antibiotics, or physical therapy? Did you have any problems with infection?
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 05/21/2005 08:31 AM

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bpant

Posts: 6

Thank you again for your interest in my case. Your information is greatly appreciated
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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bpant

Posts: 6

Thank you so much for responding to my cry for information. Your reply was quite uplifting. I do plan to wait as long as possible for a total shoulder replacement, but it is encouraging to hear someone is living a very active life after surgery.
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

I think this last posting covers shoulder surgery/replacement pretty well.
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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kryckert1

Posts: 182

Hi, I hope you don't mind me jumping in. I had a shoulder replacement done and I could play golf if that was the sport of my choice, but it's not. I played volleyball, including digging for the low balls and I rock climbed too. You have to really hit physical therapy hard, and I mean HARD, to build up the muscles in your arm, shoulder and back. Your swing will be different, and you will probably have to re-train yourself and start over from the beginning. It might be at least 6 months before you get to take a swing, but if you really love golf and you really get your muscles strong, I don't think it would be a problem. The best thing to do, TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR AND PHYSICAL THERAPIST and don't do anything that might sacrifice all of the time and effort you will put into recovering from the replacement. About having a foreign part in your body, after about 3 weeks after your surgery, you don't even know it is there. Well, ok, if you go thru a metal detector you will know it is there for about the first year, and then it blends in with your muscle and doesn't set them off as often. I think if you are at a point where you are in an unbearable amount of pain, go for the replacement, but know it is a lot of hard work and comittment. If you think you can endure a few more years and are in pain just a little bit here and there, then hold off until you can't live with the pain anymore. Good Luck,


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Kirsten
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

I do not play golf. Of the activitiies that I do, my shoulder is basically "as good as" before...but not much better than before. Is that enough explaination? Before surgery I could not grasp my hands together behind my back, now I still can't. Before surgery, my shoulder hurt, now it still does. To be honest, if I had it to do again, I probably WOULDN"T have surgery because it did not "fix" anything. He was only able to smooth down the rough edges, etc., and just doing that wasn't really worth the "down" time. I am holding out for stem cell research that will hopefully be able to regrow my own cartiledge and inject it into my shoulder. I may have to wait 10 or more years, but I am vehement about NOT wanting any foreign material placed inside my body.
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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bpant

Posts: 6

Thank you for responding to my posting. Your most recent message was more encouraging than your message soon after your surgery, but you didn"t mention golf, is that because you don't play, or is it that you are unable to play? I need to know if either shoulder debridement or replacement will permit me to once again RIP at a golf ball.
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

I forgot to mention that I DID NOT keep my shoulder in a sling, nor did I NOT move it much for 6 weeks...I was back in the water performing GENTLE range of motions after 2 weeks (necessary to ward off infection or I would have been back sooner). The trick is to listen (feel) your body (shoulder) and ONLY move it gently just a slight bit past what is comfortable...little by little, day by day, the range of motion returns...but, to be honest, I probably have more problems that have appeared with my shoulder SINCE the arthroscopic surgery?
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

Hi, I recovered pretty well from shoulder surgery. About the replacement...I am holding off until stem cell research can successfully duplicate my own cartiledge and inject it into my shoulder. I DO NOT want any foreign parts inside my body...of course I'm only 52 and I have limited range of motion and my shoulder hurts almost all the time, but still....
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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bpant

Posts: 6

I am curious as to how well you have recovered from your shoulder surgery. I also have severe arthritis, and need some kind of surgery. My doctor said I would eventually come to a total shoulder replacement, but I would like to opt for something less drastic. I am 58 years old, and have been a single digit handicap for years until this most recent episode of shoulder pain put a halt to my playing. Is there any quality golf in my future?
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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30323915

Posts: 344

Keep in mind...6 weeks really isn't a terribly long period of time - and the 6 weeks of relative inactivity will provide you with many years with a healthy shoulder. I would not risk the results of your surgery by being too active post-surgery. Good luck!
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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Brasshorses

Posts: 2

Hello, In answer to a question........yes your shoulder will be immobilzed for at least 6 weeks.....even if you were gonna heed what doc says and go with out sling and try to use it you will have had surgery for no reason.and trust me you will have to do alot of therapy to even be able to move your arm....i am trying to rush mine.....i had surgery on march 12 and still hurts to move and cant move much be myself.,the first month of therapy is passive movement which means ur theapist moves it but u can not do it cause u r not suppossed to even move muscle....painfull but hopefully worth it.......good luck
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 05/21/2005 08:30 AM

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takana

Posts: 8

I have had pain, impingement, restricted movement and strength in my right shoulder for almost 10 years. Up until recently, the only treatment that I was offered were cortisone shots, PT, and the option of removing an inch from my clavical. Now, after having a MRI and Xrays that show severe arthritis, possible rotator cuff tears, and a lot of fluid in the shoulder joint, I am scheduled to have shoulder surgery. The Dr. will go in arthroscopitically and do what is necessary. The problem is that I am 50 years old and it has taken me over 3 months of daily exercise to attain some relative level of physical fitness. I do NOT want to be incapacitated for 4-6 weeks and totally atrophy. Will I be able to "work around" having my right arm in a sling while working out? What about water exercise? How long before I can go into the ocean(I live in Hawaii)?
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