should I be scared of surgery

< REFRESH >
Topic Title: should I be scared of surgery
Created On: 11/16/2009 10:00 AM

View topic in raw text format.

Bookmark and Share

 04/25/2010 08:09 PM

Author Icon
JuliePC

Posts: 640

Totally agree with everyone. I've had 10 surgeries in 3 years, all have been arthroscopic except open elbow and biceps tenodesis (both shoulders). Arthroscopically, the surgeon can look around easily. Open - not so. Also, I had 1 nerve block, which was a disaster, and have done general anesthesia ever since. If you have a nausea issue from anesthesia, they can give you meds in the OR to keep nauseau under control and will make sure you are comfortable between pain meds and anti-nausea before you leave the hospital. Make sure you have some vistaril (or something similar) if you have a history of nausea reaction to pain meds. For me, it has worked well. Good luck! julie
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 04/22/2010 11:37 AM

Author Icon
cpd152

Posts: 4

You should not have open surgery for an an inpingement syndrome. I would get another surgeon. I have had surgery for my impingement. Its called subacromial decompression and was done arthoscopically. Recovery time was about 3 to 4 months and if you follow the rehab program correctly, you will feel much better and more range of motion as well as no pain. Make sure you do the home exercises as well as at the rehab for the best results. The surgery takes about 2 hrs and there is a local block administered as well as general anesthesia.



    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/18/2009 07:44 PM

Author Icon
Michael14668

Posts: 457

If you need a bankart repair, they are going to dislocate your shoulder in the OR during surgery, you don't want to be awake for that. There is a lot of "manipulation" done to the joint before and during surgery, go to sleep, trust me.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/18/2009 03:46 PM

Author Icon
tinasabrina

Posts: 5

thanks swank....I have decided to have a general anesthesia done, now I'm up to the part where I make the appt for surgery...still scared..but more hopeful now.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/18/2009 08:08 AM

Author Icon
swank

Posts: 307

They don't do local anesthesia on shoulders very often. It's possible I suppose but I would never agree to that. Nerve blocks don't always work. It didn't in my case. General anesthesia is a breeze. You go to sleep and wake up what seems like seconds later and it's over. I've been through over 20 surgeries and have never had a problem. I have had problems with local anesthesia and will never go that route again. Even if you don't have general anesthesia you'll be so out of it you might as well be asleep. It's not like you're wide awake in there.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/17/2009 11:59 AM

Author Icon
tinasabrina

Posts: 5

Thanks to all who answered me, I appreciate it so much...and I agree. I will get the 2nd opinion and from an MD who does the arthro surgeries. I am in a lot of pain...but still just terrified of surgery. I think I'd like to be awake during surgery, is this a possibility...have you ever heard of this with this type of surgery. I could put some earplugs in or something so I didn't have to hear to much..it's the anesthesia that freaks me out...I wonder if they could just do a local type of surgery?
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/16/2009 08:32 PM

Author Icon
liz414

Posts: 35

I totally agree with Michael. Just had instability surgery done arthroscopically last month. When I did the other shoulder 17 years ago, it was only done as an open and I now have an irrepairable tear - maybe because of the muscles cut at the time. Get a second opinion from someone that only does shoulders - especially with your medical history. Good luck...
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/16/2009 07:07 PM

Author Icon
Michael14668

Posts: 457

The procedure is for anterior capsulolabral reconstruction for anterior instability. This procedure was an open one 12 years ago, but today I would only have it done arthroscopically. Open surgery produces a lot of scar tissue. Consider a second opinion before doing open surgery.A shoulder specialist wouldn't approach it open, that is old medicine with too many problems with scar tissue and cutting good muscles for no reason. Arthroscopy is so much easier to heal from, considering you are diabetic, I'd only do it that way.Shoulder specialists are only performing open procedures when they need a bone graft for a bankart procedure and just about never for a SAD.Good luck,Mike
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/16/2009 06:25 PM

Author Icon
tinasabrina

Posts: 5

Thanks so much for your response swank. I know, I thought it would be arthroscopy done too, but he says he does not do them because he doesn't feel they are as thorough as an open. He is one of the top rated ortho surgeons in western new york. He explained the arthro to me, and he said lots of time in doing them they still need to do an open. I hate the fact of having an open done, yet I am so comfortable with this doctor (he also did a wonderful job on my mom's hip several years ago. Today in therapy I had a patch put on that uses electrodes, I still have pain in my shoulder and arm, so I'm not so sure this is going to help. Do you know what the bankhart procedure is?
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/16/2009 11:32 AM

Author Icon
swank

Posts: 307

If your surgeon is wanting to open surgery I would go see another surgeon. This kind of surgery rarely requires an open incision. I've had way more work done 6 times and and have always had it done arthroscopically.As surgeries go, this one is pretty simple. But often you have more things wrong when the doctor gets in there. If there's no repair work done and just impingement you should be good to go in less than a month. The surgery can take less than an hour to more than an hour depending on what gets done. There's really no predicting that. You'll probably be in the recovery room for an hour or so and then back to your room. All in all a few hours in the hospital is all it takes. You need to ask all these questions at your pre-op appointment.The high blood pressure and diabetes won't be a problem. They are used to dealing with that and all will be monitored.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/16/2009 10:00 AM

Author Icon
tinasabrina

Posts: 5

I have been diagnosed with r-shoulder inpingement syndrome. I've have 6 months of back and forth therapy, 7 cortosteriod injections, icing, heat, no luck. The injections last about 2 months tops, then the pain comes back. I have been unable to sleep on my right side since March 09. I have other health problems that make me somewhat hesitant regarding surgery. HB pressure, and diabetes (although my endocrinologist told me I should not have any problems because I am controlled and my numbers are not high)-only side effect would be longer healing time if my diabetes is not controlled. So I guess, I want to know if anyone has had surgery for this, how long did the actual surgery take (My ortho wants to do a open surgery on me), how long are you in recovery, and how long is rehab arpprox. I have just about made my mind up to have the surgery as I cannot continue in the amount of pain I'm in (some days on a scale of 1-10 it is an 11). I'm interested in everyone's thoughts and I need some support. I'm so scared of surgery. Even though my ortho said surgery is 45 min to 1 hr. Thanks
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    

Bookmark and Share

View topic in raw text format.
< REFRESH >
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Shoulder News
Feature Story
Shoulder Technology
Real Life Recoveries
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
 Shoulder  Hero™
Dr. Evan Flatow:
Innovating Shoulder Surgery
About Heroes
 Community
Shoulder1 Forums
Patient Stories
Shoulder Journals
 Reference
Ask an Expert
FAQ's
Locate a Doctor
Reference Library
Anatomy
Video Library
 Bookmark Us
 
advertisement
Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
advertisement
© 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.