Ream and Run Recovery

< REFRESH >
Topic Title: Ream and Run Recovery
Created On: 01/03/2012 08:48 AM

Pages: [ 1 2 >> Next ]
View topic in raw text format.

Bookmark and Share

 01/02/2017 11:26 AM

Author Icon
yar250f

Posts: 5

 have you any new info as to success rate of prolotherapy- age 61 osteoarthritis , rotator cuff tears, seperation between humerus and socket non- existent

    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/17/2012 10:40 AM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81


Good point. It pretty much depends on how far the condition has progresses. In my case, both the ball and the socket had disintegrated. There wasn't just cartilage loss. The joint was in pieces. There was no saving anything. I agree that the risk of joint replacement surgery may be greater than prolotherapy. So, perhaps this treatment option is suited for some. At any rate, thanks for your update and good luck.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/17/2012 12:45 AM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

HGH is FDA approved. As long as it's not abused, it's considered safe. It's been used in prolotherapy for many many years. Here's one of many articles on it http://prolotherapysc.com/pdf/Dr_Ravin_HGH.pdf. Again, my main point here is to show people non-invasive ways to heal orthopedic issues. I think we can both agree that you can't undue a very invasive surgery and the detrimental effects it can have on you if there are complications. As an example, in 2008 there were 4964 documented deaths due to knee replacement complications and that's just through Medicare (Yikes!). Prolotherapy has been proven to be extremely safe in all its various forms with almost a 0% complication rate. To me it's a no brainer to try prolotherapy first. Really all you have to lose is that it doesn't work.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/15/2012 07:03 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

I read your story on kneeguru, and I'm really glad it helped you. But the fact that HGH was involved would already turn me off. The side effects are severe and are not fully understood. Additionally, we have to be sure the improvement has a lasting effect.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/12/2012 06:46 AM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

FullROM50,

The MRI report clearly states that 50% of the cartilage regenerated in the defect on my humerus (right where they put the stem cells). Tonight when I have time I'll upload the whole report since I guess you still find it hard to believe. If I can figure out how to do the pics too I will do that. Obviously I don't take any pain meds, never have. If you knew anything about prolotherapy or stem cell therapy you would know that meds would defeat the whole process behind that approach. I plan on getting another injection in 6 months. If you'd like you can read my full journey so far here at kneeguru...http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61013.0.

    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/11/2012 10:44 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

I'm very glad to hear your stem cell treatment was successful. And yes, I'm a critic and still sceptical. Can you provide before and after radiographs, so we can see where the 50% regrowth of cartilage took place? It's nice to know your shoulder feels better and that's ultimately what's important. Are you taking any meds that might cause your shoulder to feel better? Also are you going to need more injections to achieve 100% regeneration? I wish you good luck and a full recovery. FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 11/09/2012 04:21 PM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

I'd like to give an update on my condition. I've received 3 stem cell injections throughout one years time for my 1.5 x 2cm full thickness defect on my humerus. The recent MRI states 50% regeneration of new cartilage within the defect. My pain is way down and range of motion is great. They just featured my case in a blog post, the link is below. Hopefully this sheds some light on the critics out there...

http://www.regenexx.com/2012/11/stem-cell-based-shoulder-cartilage-regeneration-in-philly/
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/28/2012 11:26 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

It can work for women. I've talked to one who was progressing very well in rehab at the time I had my surgery. She was an aerobics instructor and very motivated. Not trying to contradict the study, but I wouldn't place too much stake on that. I do know that people who have had too many surgeries on the shoulder will have difficulty achieving perfect ROM due to scar tissue. I'm sure my surgeon, Dr. Moskal could correct your problem, if your rotator cuff is in good shape, and your overall health is good enough to make it through 12 weeks of intense rehab.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/24/2012 06:18 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

Interesting articles by Dr. Matsen - the first was just published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, July 18, 2012. The most important thing is having a good result, but this doesn't appear to work for women.

The Prognosis for Improvement in Comfort and Function After the Ream-and-Run Arthroplasty for Glenohumeral Arthritis: An Analysis of 176 Consecutive Cases

Knowledge of the factors affecting the prognosis for improvement in function and comfort with time after shoulder arthroplasty is important to clinical decision-making. This study sought to identify some of these factors in 176 consecutive patients undergoing the ream-and-run procedure.

This study is unique in that it characterizes the factors affecting the time course for improvement in shoulder comfort and function after a ream-and-run procedure. Improvement occurs after this procedure for at least 1.5 years. This procedure appears to be best suited for an older male patient with reasonable preoperative shoulder function without prior shoulder surgery.

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 2007
Shoulder arthroplasty: the socket perspective.
Matsen, Bicknell, Lippitt

Although much attention has been directed to the development of the humeral components used in shoulder arthroplasty, the major unsolved challenge lies on the glenoid side of the articulation. This challenge arises from difficulties resisting eccentric loading and providing adequate implant-bone fixation. Current glenoid component designs use polyethylene and polymethyl methacrylate and are prone to loosening, plastic deformation, particulate debris, and third-body wear. Metal-backed components present further challenges, and results have generally been disappointing. There is interest in biologic resurfacing procedures, including the interposition of fascia, capsule, or meniscal allograft and nonprosthetic glenoid arthroplasty, or what has become known as the "ream-and-run" procedure. Despite encouraging results, important questions remain unanswered about these procedures. However, each may warrant further exploration with a goal of providing an effective and durable approach to glenoid arthritis that avoids the risks associated with polymethyl methacrylate and polyethylene.


    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/24/2012 04:57 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

As I stated earlier, great potential, but not ready for prime time...Meanwhile, even after 2.5 years past ream and run surgery my shoulder is still improving in strength. I'm over the moon pleased with the outcome. FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/15/2012 05:29 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

From the journal Arthroscopy (from editors of journal - vol. 28 issue 7, July 2012

"However, when it comes to biologics in arthroscopy, we still have a lot to learn. Most of the literature on biologics, tissue engineering, growth factors, and stem cells shows that there is great variability that must be accounted for. And some published related research results are promising....As we have previously opined, “To be honest, the idea that articular hyaline cartilage regeneration and joint space restoration could be possible as a result of a single-stage arthroscopic procedure followed by injections seems too good to be true . . . At the end of the day . . . we believe many will agree that stem cells have vast potential. In the future, we are prepared for inevitable steps backward, but today we are optimists who advance two steps forward.....To borrow a Lincolnesque construction: We are confident of nature, by nature, and for nature. Some published research results are promising relevant to stem cells, and the vast magnitude of biologic variability is the obstacle researchers currently address.
I
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/15/2012 05:22 PM

Author Icon
misty3

Posts: 132

There is quite a bit of research going on in the area of stem cell and cartilage, but it is still in its infancy.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/15/2012 04:53 PM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

FULLROM50,

I agree and even Regenexx told me the earlier the stem cell treatment is administered the better chance you have of regrowing cartilage. The science and studies are there, check out this link %20OR%20%28%22mesenchymal%22[All%20Fields]%20AND%20%22stem%22[All%20Fields]%20AND%20%22cells%22[All%20Fields]%29%20OR%20%22mesenchymal%20stem%20cells%22[All%20Fields]%29%20AND%20%28%22cartilage%22[MeSH%20Terms]%20OR%20%22cartilage%22[All%20Fields]%29%20AND%20%28%22wound%20healing%22[MeSH%20Terms]%20OR%20%28%22wound%22[All%20Fields]%20AND%20%22healing%22[All%20Fields]%29%20OR%20%22wound%20healing%22[All%20Fields]%20OR%20%22repair%22[All%20Fields]%29&cmd=DetailsSearch]here for stem cell and cartilage growth published medical studies. I've done extensive research and even talked to several patients who document their stories over at the knee-guru forums. Here is a response email I received from someone who was due for a double knee replacement 5 years ago...

"Hi Nicholas,
It is holding up just fine. It has allowed me to do more strengthening exercises. You have to understand that I was 1 month away from getting 2 TKRs. I do not see the need for that at all now. I am playing singles tennis again at a high level. I do look at the threads periodically. The advancement in stem cell technology is our savior.
Saverio"

Like any procedure, this has a failure rate and I'm sure they're studying why it works for some and not for others. I do disagree with your statement that these guys are taking advantage of people. Dr. Shiple and Dr. Hauser are two of the best doctors I've ever met. They are honest and caring and do not mislead at all. I'm sure there are some knuckleheads out there taking advantage of people but that can go for any medical field. Dr. Brian Cole, the main ortho of the Chicago Bulls, is now implementing PRP into his practice. The science is there, now everyone else has to catch up. If regenerative medicine fails, then you always have surgical procedures like the ream and run to fall back on.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/15/2012 04:20 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

NickCat11,
Glad to here you're doing better. Still I'm sceptical about the claims to re-grow cartilage. I could
imagine that at very early stages there could be a recovery, but there has been no real prove of any treatment reversing arthritis. If there were proven methods, you can imagine the whole world would be after them. What makes me mad about the whole thing is that they take advantage of young and desparate individuals like yourself. People like yourself want something like this to work and therefore want to believe it. But unless there is a scientific lab test with a representative number of cases documented, the MRI or Xray on the web site means nothing. I'd ask these guys about clinical tests they performed. Please, don't get me wrong, my mind isn't closed to new ideas, I'm just sceptical that's all. Maybe you should focus on rehab. Keep the soft tissue in good shape. I always found great pain relief in performing exercises. Good nutrition also has a lot to do with it. Unfortunately, this is not what most people want to hear. It is possible to overcome the effects of arthritis for a long time with a good lifestyle. Good
Luck with all your research and treatments. Hope you're not spending too much money on this. They should
pay you. Best, FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/14/2012 10:33 PM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

quote:
Originally posted by: FullROM50
I strongly agree with trying to start with non-invasive treatment. I injured my shoulder in my teenage years, but with rehab I was pain free until 43. I would be careful with some of the methods you mentioned though. I looked at some of them, but found absolutely no evidence of them actually working. Not one x-ray of before and after. If arthritis is present that doesn't mean you cannot perform at a high level. It's how you feel, not what an MRI shows! If you can do rehab, by all means stay away from surgery. I'm quite bit older and my joint was too far gone. I still trained hard and made the best of it. When surgery is necessary, ream and run by a qualified surgeon is the best choice.

FullROM50

Hey FullROM50,

I couldn't find much either until I hit Regenexx's website. Under the "conditions treated" tab there are documented medical case studies showing before and after mri's. I get another mri in august to see if there is cartilage growth. I'm hoping there is but if not I still got about a 70% improvment after my second stem treatment. I plan on continuing stem cell treatments until "hopefully" I get near 100%.
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/08/2012 05:38 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

I strongly agree with trying to start with non-invasive treatment. I injured my shoulder in my teenage years, but with rehab I was pain free until 43. I would be careful with some of the methods you mentioned though. I looked at some of them, but found absolutely no evidence of them actually working. Not one x-ray of before and after. If arthritis is present that doesn't mean you cannot perform at a high level. It's how you feel, not what an MRI shows! If you can do rehab, by all means stay away from surgery. I'm quite bit older and my joint was too far gone. I still trained hard and made the best of it. When surgery is necessary, ream and run by a qualified surgeon is the best choice.

FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 07/06/2012 03:34 AM

Author Icon
NickCat11

Posts: 7

quote:
Originally posted by: ruinedshoulder
Hi FullROM50, I'm a 30 year old male just diagnosed with early gh arthritis. I'm very interested in this procedure, it seems like all I hear are succes stories. Have you met or heard of anyone that has had the operation fail? I ask Dr. Matsen, and he has told me that they haven't had one failure yet after the rehab was performed successfully...really amazing.

Right now, I'm considering microfracture to see if I can prevent having a total replacement at my age, but I'm also considering the R&R. The pain really isn't that bad in my case, the problem is the ache is distracting me at work and interrupting my sleep...which is very bad.

At 30 years old, I'd love to have something that lasts until I'm 60, that would be amazing, but I don't understand how fibrocartilage could hold up that long against metal? It seems like superior hyaline cartilage can't hold up against metal for very long.


Ruinedshoulder,

I'm 30 as well and have a cartilage defect that I got in my martial arts class. Like you I did a lot of research. I chose non invasive methods first including prolotherapy and stem cell therapy. They have both helped a lot, especially with the ache you mention. Infrared sauna helps a lot as well. Please research Regenexx out in Colorado and Caring Medical in Chicago. Doctors Ross Hauser and Dr. Brian Shiple (affliate of Regenexx in PA) are awesome. I would go this route before an invasive surgery. We're to young for that. Did you have an accident with your shoulder causing cartilage damage? What caused the arthritis? Email me with any [email protected]
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 06/10/2012 10:45 AM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

ruinedshoulder,
For me having ream and run performed was a very big step also. I was 49 at the time. Like you, I did lots of research, pretty much everything I could on line, two trips to Seattle to see Dr. Matsen in person, where I also received his research paper on the fibrocartilage in canine experiments. I also saw at least a dozen other surgeons. At the end, I was convinced that the REAM AND RUN is my only chance to get well and be able to do the things I like without restrictions. And, as you may have found, no other procedure has the potential to outlast the ream and run. TSR works well for many, and provides near "instant" pain relief, but for me it wasn't what I wanted.

To answer your question, about failed ream and runs. I have not heard of any, but not all turn out as good as mine. I was able to talk with several individuals who all stated significant improvements afterwards. None had regrets, but clearly not all took the rehab as seriously as I did and as a result don't have the ROM that would have been possible. I have met one athlete who had two TSRs and they turned out horrible. His second one a little better than his first.

I've had many hours of discussion and emails with Dr. Matsen and Dr. Moskal, my surgeon on the topic of longivity. Of all procedures performed out there, none have the same success-rate and potential to endure.

I would discourage you from having any other surgeries performed at this time, especially because of your young age. Buy bungees and light weights at Walmart and start exercising daily. Perform the exercises Dr. Matsen shows for post-op on his web-site. Be sure your rotator cuff, biceps, traps, pecs and deltoid are in as good a shape as possible. Do this for a year. Like me, you might find some relief in doing so. Your arthritis will progress, but so what. You can't stop it with inactivity or any other way. The more cutting you have done, the worse the final outcome, due to scar tissue.

Who knows, you may be able squeeze a few years out of it, plus your muscles are key to success for either TSR or ream and run. Feel free to email me. I'll be glad to talk with you on the phone. My email address is [email protected]

Best,
FullROM50



    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 06/08/2012 03:38 PM

Author Icon
ruinedshoulder

Posts: 11

Hi FullROM50, I'm a 30 year old male just diagnosed with early gh arthritis. I'm very interested in this procedure, it seems like all I hear are succes stories. Have you met or heard of anyone that has had the operation fail? I ask Dr. Matsen, and he has told me that they haven't had one failure yet after the rehab was performed successfully...really amazing.

Right now, I'm considering microfracture to see if I can prevent having a total replacement at my age, but I'm also considering the R&R. The pain really isn't that bad in my case, the problem is the ache is distracting me at work and interrupting my sleep...which is very bad.

At 30 years old, I'd love to have something that lasts until I'm 60, that would be amazing, but I don't understand how fibrocartilage could hold up that long against metal? It seems like superior hyaline cartilage can't hold up against metal for very long.


    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    
 06/07/2012 09:14 PM

Author Icon
FullROM50

Posts: 81

Jennifer,
What geffed describes is much different than what I experienced having the same procedure performed on me. My shoulder was in terrible shape to include osteonecrosis, huge bone spures and free floating debris. I was in pain for four days after surgery, and was prescibed the typical after surgery pain meds. Nevertheless, I performed the overhead stretching exercises immediately after surgery five times a day. Also did a lot of walking. After four days I reduced the meds by 50 percent, and at 10 days post-op I was on over the counter Tylenol once a day. After three weeks, I used no regular pain pills. At five weeks post-op, none whatsoever. My ROM is 100 percent and my strength. There is zero discomfort or pain now.

If you want to know more, feel free to ask.

Best,
FullROM50
    REPLY     Quote     Top     Bottom    

Bookmark and Share

Pages: [ 1 2 >> Next ]
View topic in raw text format.
< REFRESH >
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Shoulder News
Feature Story
Shoulder Technology
Real Life Recoveries
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
 Shoulder  Hero™
Dr. Evan Flatow:
Innovating Shoulder Surgery
About Heroes
 Community
Shoulder1 Forums
Patient Stories
Shoulder Journals
 Reference
Ask an Expert
FAQ's
Locate a Doctor
Reference Library
Anatomy
Video Library
 Bookmark Us
 
advertisement
Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
advertisement
© 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.